Your guide to eye conditions

Sight is such an important part of our lives – and something we want to help protect.

Like any other medical condition, it’s good for you to be familiar with symptoms of common eye conditions so you know what to look out for, what you can do and when to seek help.

Your eyes can also indicate signs of more problematic issues to do with your general health like diabetes and high blood pressure. Symptoms of these conditions are not always obvious, so regular eye tests are an essential part of maintaining your health.

Your eyes can also indicate signs of more problematic issues to do with your general health like diabetes and high blood pressure. Symptoms of these conditions are not always obvious, so regular eye tests are an essential part of maintaining your health.

Blepharitis

Red and swollen eyelids – particularly around the edges – that can be caused by an infection or a skin condition. It’s not serious but it can lead to further problems.

Cataracts

Cloudy patches in the lens of the eye, causing blurry, misty vision. Usually more common in people over 65.

Conjunctivitis

Inflammation of the membrane that covers the eye and inside of the eyelids, making the eye look red with a burning or itchy feeling.

Diabetic retinopathy

A condition caused by diabetes that affects the small blood vessels in the eye, damaging the retina, which is vital for sight.

Dry eye syndrome

Occurs when your eyes don’t make enough tears or they evaporate too quickly causing dry, red and irritated eyes.

Floaters

The appearance of spots or strands floating across your vision, particularly against a bright background.

Glaucoma

A group of diseases affecting the optic nerve often associated with a build up of pressure in the eye. There are two types: chronic and acute.

Hay fever

A common allergic reaction to pollen at certain times of the year, causing irritated and inflamed eyes.

Macular degeneration

Affects your central vision and your ability to focus on things like driving, faces and reading. There are two types: dry and wet.

Presbyopia

A natural loss of elasticity of the lens from around the age of 40 that affects your ability to focus on things close-up, like reading.

Red eye

It may look alarming, but it’s usually a sign of a minor condition like conjunctivitis. But it may be a more serious issue if you feel any pain.

Watering eyes

Occurs if too many tears are produced or if they can’t drain properly causing sore, uncomfortable eyes with blurred vision.